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Scoville Scale Chart for Hot Sauce and Hot Peppers

I’m a chilehead. I’ve tried to compile the most comprehensive list of the hottest hot sauces and hot peppers on the web. If there is any hot sauce or pepper missing from this Scoville Scale list that your think I should add, please contact me and let me know about it. I need to know the Scoville rating for each sauce suggested, as well any other helpful information and links.

Some of the items (especially the ones in excess of one million Scoville Heat Units and hotter) below may not necessarily be “sauces” you apply directly on food — they are food additives and should only be used sparingly. The very highest ones are not liquid at all. These are capsaicin extracts and are powders or crystals, as pure capsaicin comes in crystaline form.

For more information on how the Scoville Scale for hot peppers and hot sauces is determined, read the What is the Scoville Scale article.

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All Only Sauces Only Chile Peppers  

  Photo  Sauce/Peppersort by name  Scoville Unitssort by scoville rating
Smokin' Ed's Carolina Reaper Pepper Smokin’ Ed’s Carolina Reaper Pepper

As of 2014, this is currently the Guinness World Record holder for World’s Hottest Chile, the Carolina Reaper pepper was grown by Ed Currie of Puckerbutt Pepper Company out of South Carolina. Also known as the HB22a.

1,400,000 – 2,200,000

440 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Trinidad Moruga Scorpion Trinidad Moruga Scorpion

A superhot strain closely related to the Trinidad Scorpion Butch T. as of February 2012, it had been tested as the world’s hottest chile pepper until the Carolina Reaper usurped it in November of 2013.

580,198 – 2,009,231

401.8 times hotter
than a jalapeño

7-Pot Douglah 7-Pot Douglah
"A version of the super-hot 7-Pot, 7 Pot Douglah, or Chocolate 7 Pod. Super-intense chile pepper that ranks up with the hottest, including the Carolina Reaper, Moruga Scorpion, Trinidad Scorpion Butch T, and the Bhut/Naga jolokia"
923,589 – 1,853,936

370.79 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Trinidad 7 Pot Primo Trinidad 7 Pot Primo

Grown by Troy Primeaux (nicknamed “Primo”), these are a cross between Naga Morich and 7 Pot chiles. Primeaux has since then grown them out for 6+ generations. 7 Pot Primos have are very distinctive with its long skinny “tail”. They are among the top 5 hottest chile peppers on earth.

1,469,000

293.8 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Trinidad Scorpion (Butch T strain) Trinidad Scorpion (Butch T strain)

A superhot, bitter chile originating from the island of Trinidad. The Trinidad Scorpion was the world’s hottest chile pepper in 2011 (it has since been dethroned by its sister strain, the Trinidad Moruga Scorpion) but is the current Guinness World Record holder until the folks at Guinness take a look at the recent NMSU CPI superhot research that was released in February 2012. The pods often look similar to a mushroom cloud or a jellyfish with slight habanero/scotch bonnet-like characteristics, and have a slightly bumpy appearance.

Neil Smith of The Hippy Seed Company had a Trinidad Scorpion chile rated at 1,463,700 SHU, and named the origin strain after the one who provided the seeds, Butch Taylor of Zydeco Sauces.

1,463,700

292.74 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Naga Viper Naga Viper

The Naga Viper pepper has a rating of 1,382,118 Scoville Heat Units (SHU). It is an unstable three-way hybrid produced from the Naga Morich, the Bhut Jolokia and the Trinidad Scorpion (some of the world’s hottest peppers). Due to the nature of it being a hybrid it is unable to produce offspring exactly like the parent due to segregation of alleles and therefore traits.

1,382,118

276.42 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Trinidad 7 Pot Jonah Trinidad 7 Pot Jonah

A superhot similar to the 7 Pot Douglah strain.

800,000 – 1,200,000

240 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Gibralta / Spanish Naga Chili Pepper Gibralta / Spanish Naga Chili Pepper
"The Gibralta Naga, or Spanish Naga, is of course grown in Spain, but was developed in the UK from Indian chili peppers. It beat out the Bhut Jolokia for hottest pepper, but was soon overtaken. As they are grown, they are stressed by creating a hot environment, which helps to make the chiles extremely hot.

They grow to about 3 inches and are round on top with a tapered end. They start out green and mature to red with wrinkled, knobby skin."

1,086,844

217.37 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Infinity Chilli Infinity Chilli

The Infinity Chile Pepper is a chili pepper created in England by chili breeder Nick Woods of Fire Foods, Grantham, Lincolnshire. For two weeks in February 2011, the Infinity Chilli held the Guinness World Record title for the world’s hottest chilli with a Scoville scale rating of 1,067,286 Scoville Heat Units (SHU).

1,067,286

213.46 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Bhut Jolokia Pepper / Ghost Chile Pepper Bhut Jolokia Pepper / Ghost Chile Pepper

The Bhut/Naga/Bih Jolokia pepper is a chile pepper found naturally in the army garrison town of Tezpur, in the north-eastern state of Assam, India. It is a naturally occurring chile and held the Guinness World Record for the world’s hottest pepper from 2007 until Januray 2011.

The Bhut Jolokia is also know as The “Ghost Chili/Chile”, Nagahari, Naga Jolokia, Bih Jolokia, Borbih, Raja Mircha, Raja Chilli, Mirch, Mircha, Naga Moresh, Naga Morich, Tezpur, Bih Jolokia and Bhwt Jolokiya (with possible slight variations).

855,000 – 1,041,427

208.29 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Dorset Naga Pepper Dorset Naga Pepper

The Dorset Naga pepper (Capsicum chinense) is a variety of chile pepper grown in West Bexington, Dorset, England.

876,000 – 970,000

194 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Trinidad 7 Pot CARDI Strain Trinidad 7 Pot CARDI Strain

A superhot similar to the 7 Pot Douglah strain.

850,000

170 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Trinidad Yellow Scorpion Trinidad Yellow Scorpion

A slightly less-hot version of the red Trinidad Scorpion Pepper.

400,000 – 600,000

120 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Red Savina Habanero Pepper Red Savina Habanero Pepper

The Red Savina pepper is a cultivar of the habanero chile (Capsicum chinense Jacquin), which has been selectively bred to produce hotter, heavier, and larger peppers. They have been measured to reach as high as nearly 580,000 Scoville units.

350,000 – 577,000

115.4 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Devil's Tongue - Chocolate Devil’s Tongue – Chocolate

A brown-colored version of the hot devil’s tongue pepper

500,000

100 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Devil's Tongue - Red Devil’s Tongue – Red

A red-colored version of the hot devil’s tongue pepper

400,000 – 500,000

100 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Congo Pepper - Black Congo Pepper – Black

A black-colored version of the hot Congo chile

300,000 – 500,000

100 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Jamaican Hot Pepper - Chocolate Jamaican Hot Pepper – Chocolate

A hot pepper variety originating from Jamaica, in a spicier brown color

300,000 – 500,000

100 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Habanero Chile Pepper - Chocolate Habanero Chile Pepper – Chocolate

This is a brown-colored version of the popular habanero pepper.

300,000 – 500,000

100 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Trinidad Yellow 7 Pot Trinidad Yellow 7 Pot
"A slightly less hot version of the Trinidad 7 Pot"
500,000 – 600,000

100 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Devil's Tongue - Yellow Devil’s Tongue – Yellow

A yellow-colored version of the hot devil’s tongue pepper.

400,000

80 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Congo Pepper - Red Congo Pepper – Red

A red-colored version of the hot Congo chile

300,000 – 400,000

80 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Habanero Chile Pepper - Orange Habanero Chile Pepper – Orange

The habanero chile (Capsicum chinense Jacquin) (Spanish, from Havana) is the most intensely spicy chile pepper of the Capsicum genus. It is a popular ingredient in super-hot sauces and dishes. This orange-colored version is perhaps the most widespread variation of habaneros.

100,000 – 350,000

70 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Scotch Bonnet Pepper Scotch Bonnet Pepper

The Scotch Bonnet is a variety of chile pepper similar to and of the same species as the habanero. A cultivar of the habanero, it is reputed by some as one of the hottest peppers in the world. It is found mainly in the Caribbean islands and is named for its resemblance to a Scot’s bonnet. Most Scotch Bonnets have a heat rating between 150,000 and 325,000 Scoville Units.

100,000 – 325,000

65 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Congo Pepper - Yellow Congo Pepper – Yellow

A yellowcolored version of the hot Congo chile

300,000

60 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Birds Eye Pepper Birds Eye Pepper
"Bird’s eye chili, bird’s chili or Thai chili, is a chili pepper, a cultivar from the species Capsicum annuum, commonly found in Southeast Asia. It is often confused with a similar-looking chili derived from the species Capsicum frutescens, the cultivar ‘siling labuyo’. Bird’s eye chili can also be found in India, in Meghalaya and Kerala."
100,000 – 225,000

45 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Madame Jeanette Madame Jeanette
"These peppers are used amongst others in Surinam and the Netherlands to make a great, bright yellow sambal."
225,000

45 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Jamaican Hot Pepper - Red Jamaican Hot Pepper – Red

A hot pepper variety originating from Jamaica

200,000

40 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Carolina Cayenne Pepper Carolina Cayenne Pepper
"The Carolina Cayenne Pepper is a native of Central and South America. Today, it is cultivated around the world and offered as a spice. A mature Carolina Cayenne will be over five inches in length and about an inch in width. This pepper first appears in green on the plant. With maturation, it turns to a blood red color. They have very wrinkled and thin skin with the shape of an elongated teardrop. Carolina Cayenne’s are nearly two times as hot as the typical cayenne pepper. The Scoville heat scale shows a rating for them of 100,000-125,000 SHU or Scoville Heat Units."
100,000 – 125,000

25 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Fatalli Pepper Fatalli Pepper

The Fatalii (Capsicum chinense) is a chili that originates in central and southern Africa. It is described to have a fruity, citrus flavor with a searing heat that is comparably hotter to the standard habanero. The Scoville units of a Fatalii range about 125,000 ~ 400,000 units.

125,000 – 400,000

25 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Tabiche Pepper Tabiche Pepper
"Originally from India, the Tabiche pepper can now be found growing worldwide and often year-round, but it does best in hot, dry climates. It grows to about three inches in length and an inch in width, with the shape of a thin teardrop. It has wrinkled, thin skin, and can mature to a pale yellow or a bright, glossy red."
85,000 – 115,000

23 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Bahamian Pepper Bahamian Pepper
"As its name suggests, the Bahamian pepper originates from the Bahamas, where it is still one of the major agricultural crops. This small, round pepper grows to only about an inch in length, and may be found in an assortment of colors, including yellow, orange, green and red. Interestingly, the Bahamian pepper grows upright in clusters, unlike most peppers that hang from their stems.

At roughly 100,000 Scovilles, they are hotter than the cayenne, but not quite as hot as most habaneros. They make a deliciously spicy addition to many foods and dishes."

95,000 – 110,000

22 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Thai Pepper Thai Pepper

There are three varities of thai peppers, the hottest of which can reach as high as 100,000 on the Scoville scale.

50,000 – 100,000

20 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Chiltepin pepper Chiltepin pepper

Chiltepin is a wild chile pepper that grows in Mexico and the southwestern United States. It is sometimes called the “mother of all peppers,” because it is thought to be the oldest species in the Capsicum genus. The chiles are extremely hot, rating 50,000 to 100,000 Scoville units, but the heat quickly dissipates.

50,000 – 100,000

20 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Datil Pepper Datil Pepper

A very hot chili; primarily grown in Florida.

100,000 to 300,000

20 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Jamaican Hot Pepper - Yellow Jamaican Hot Pepper – Yellow

A hot pepper variety originating from Jamaica, in a milder yellow color

100,000

20 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Pico de Pajaro Pepper Pico de Pajaro Pepper

Translates to “Bird’s beak” and originates from Yecora, Sonora, Mexico. The knobby fruit are often curved. Pods are almost 1″ wide and 5-51/2″ long. Also known as ‘Cola de Rata’ (Rat tail).

70,000 – 100,000

14 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Charleston Hot Pepper Charleston Hot Pepper

Similar to the Carolina Cayenne, the Charleston Hot is a variety of Cayenne created by the U.S. Department of Agriculture in South Carolina. Although it was not bred for its heat, it is much hotter than a regular cayenne, which averages about 30,000 Scovilles. In fact, it’s almost as hot as a habanero but with a great cayenne flavor.

The Charleston Hot starts out green and turns to yellow, then orange, then bright red. It can be harvested during its immature stages, but most people are familiar with its typical mature, red color. The peppers are long and skinny, growing to about 5 inches in length, and 3/4 inch in width.

70,000 – 100,000

14 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Malagueta Pepper Malagueta Pepper

Malagueta pepper is a type of chile used in Brazil, Portugal and Mozambique. It is heavily used in the Bahia area of Brazil . It apparently gets its name from the unrelated melegueta pepper from West Africa (Zingiberaceae).
It is a small, tapered, green pepper that turns red as it matures. It is about 2 inches in length at maturity. It is a very hot pepper, with a range of 60,000 to 100,000 Scoville units (about the same as Tabasco peppers). There are two sizes seen in markets, which will sometimes have different names: the smaller ones are called “malaguetinha” in Brazil and “piri-piri” in Portugal and Mozambique, and the larger ones are called “malaguetao” in Brazil and “malagueta” in Portugal. They are not different varieties, just peppers of different maturities from the same plant.

60,000

12 times hotter
than a jalapeño

China Express Pepper China Express Pepper
"Biting, red, and scorching hot peppers."
60,000 – 100,000

12 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Diablo Grande Pepper Diablo Grande Pepper
"A banana-type chile pepper that packs plenty of heat, the Diablo Grande is several times hotter than jalapeno and serrano peppers. It is one of numerous members of the Longum group, which encompasses poblanos, serranos, jalapenos, cayenne peppers and various other chile peppers. These annual vegetables descend from varieties that were grown and selected by Native Americans for thousands of years."
60,000 – 100,000

12 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Piquin Pepper Piquin Pepper

Sometimes spelled “pequin”, the Piquin pepper (pronunciation: pee/puh-KEEN) is a hot chili pepper cultivar commonly used as a spice.

Pequin has a compact habit growing typically 0.3-0.6 meters tall, with bright green, ovate leaves and small fruits that rarely exceed 2 cm in length. Like most chiles, fruits start out green, ripening to brilliant red at maturity. Pequin peppers are very hot, often 13-40 times hotter than jalapenos on the Scoville scale (100,000-140,000 units). Flavor is described as citrusy, smoky (if dried with wood smoke), and nutty Common uses include pickling, salsas and sauces, soups, and vinegars. The popular Cholula brand hot sauce lists piquin peppers and arbol peppers among its ingredients.

40,000 – 58,000

11.6 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Super Chile Pepper Super Chile Pepper

These small peppers grow upright in clusters and mature from light green to red, often with shades of orange in between. They do best in a hot, humid climate. They grow to 1 1/2″-2″ in length and 1/2″- 1″ in width and have a cone shape. They are decorative and colorful, and are often used as a border in gardens with limited space.

40,000 – 50,000

10 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Cayenne Pepper Cayenne Pepper

Cayenne pepper is a popular, hot red pepper used to flavor spicy dishes and sauces.

30,000 – 50,000

10 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Aji Pepper Aji Pepper

The Aji pepper, also known as Peruvian hot pepper, is a unique species of chili pepper, Capsicum baccatum, containing several different breeds.

30,000 – 50,000

10 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Santaka Pepper Santaka Pepper

The Santaka Pepper is a hot chili pepper that originates from Japan. It is rather small in size, measuring about two inches in length and up to an inch in width, at maturity. It has a tapered teardrop shape and a vibrant red color. At harvest time, the skin of the fruit is thin and wrinkled. The flavor of the Santaka pepper is one of intense spiciness.

30,000 – 50,000

10 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Tabasco Pepper Tabasco Pepper

The tabasco pepper a variety of the chile pepper species Capsicum frutescens. It is best known through its use in Tabasco sauce. A medium hot to very hot pepper.

30,000 – 50,000

10 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Tien Tsin Pepper Tien Tsin Pepper

A hot pepper variety grown and used in China.

50,000-75,000

10 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Manzano Pepper Manzano Pepper

Manzano chile peppers are relatives of the hot South American rocoto peppers. They are used most often in fresh form because the pods are so thick they are difficult to dry. These peppers are great for making hot salsas. It is unusual in that it has black seeds.

12,000 – 30,000

6 times hotter
than a jalapeño

de Arbol pepper de Arbol pepper

A slender, commonly-used pepper with a medium hot taste.

15,000 – 30,000

6 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Serrano Pepper Serrano Pepper

A serrano pepper is a type of chile pepper that originated in the mountainous regions of the Mexican states of Puebla and Hidalgo.

10,000 – 23,000

4.6 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Chungyang Red Pepper Chungyang Red Pepper
"The Chungyang Red Pepper’ is a small-sized chili pepper that has a strong burning sensation when eaten. It is a cultivar of the species Capsicum annuum originating in South Korea and developed by Dr. Il-ung Yoo by hybridizing Thai and Jeju-do cultivars. Chungyang Red Peppers have 10,000 – 23,000 Scoville heat units."
10,000 – 23,000

4.6 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Aleppo Pepper Aleppo Pepper

The Aleppo pepper, also known as the Halaby pepper, is named after the city of Aleppo in Northern Syria. It is commonly grown in Syria and Turkey, and is usually dried and crushed.

Aleppo pepper is used in Mediterranean and Middle Eastern cuisine, although it has become very popular around the world as an alternative to crushed red pepper or paprika, due to its beautiful deep red color, rich fruity undertones and aromatic flavor. It is perfect for chili, pizza, sauces, or anywhere you may normally use paprika, if you like the extra heat. However, it is not as hot as conventional crushed red pepper, because it is de-seeded before it is crushed.

10,000

2.1 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Wax Pepper Wax Pepper

The Hungarian wax pepper is a pastel yellow chile pepper also known as the hot yellow pepper or hot wax pepper. The Hungarian wax is closely related to the mild banana pepper. These peppers appear so much alike they cannot usually be distinguished except by taste. They are often used in Hungarian stews and go well with bean dishes.

5,000 – 10,000

2 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Chipotle Pepper Chipotle Pepper

There is no naturally-occurring chipotle in nature; it is simply a jalapeno pepper that has been smoked. It has a slightly higher Scoville count than a regular Jalapeno. Spicy, smoky, sweet, and flavorful.

5,000 – 10,000

2 times hotter
than a jalapeño

Jalapeño Pepper Jalapeño Pepper

Perhaps the most popular and most widely-used hot pepper in the western world. The jalapeño is a small to medium-sized chile pepper that is prized for the hot, burning sensation that it produces in the mouth when eaten. Jalapeños have a wide variety of culinary uses: snacks, dishes, sauces and salsas are just a few. The jalapeño is known by different names throughout Mexico: cuaresmenos, huachinangos and chiles gordos. A smoked jalapeño is known as a chipotle pepper.

2,500 – 8,000

Guajillo Pepper Guajillo Pepper

Sometimes (incorrectly) spelled “guajilla”. They are thick, leathery dark reddish brown (when mature) chiles that contain mild to moderate amounts of heat. The guajillo is one of the most commonly grown chiles in Mexico. This chile requires a longer soaking period than most due to its leathery skin.

2,500 – 5,000

approx. equal in heat
to a jalapeño

Sandia Pepper Sandia Pepper

A spicy, southern “NuMex” pepper.

1,500 – 2,500

Only 50% the heat
of a jalapeño

Rocotillo Pepper Rocotillo Pepper

Rocotillos are clustered, bell-blossom-shaped peppers with a pleasant flavor, often served fresh to accompany roasted meats or cooked beans.

1,500 – 2,500

Only 50% the heat
of a jalapeño

Cascabel Pepper Cascabel Pepper

The cascabel is a small, round, hot chilli pepper. It is a cultivar of the species Capsicum annuum. Its name is a Spanish word for “small bell” or “rattle”. The pepper, when dried makes a rattling noise and as such can be used to make music.

1,000 – 2,500

Only 50% the heat
of a jalapeño

Cherry Pepper Cherry Pepper

Also called Hungarian cherry peppers, these are mild and sweet. Very similar to the cascabel pepper. Small in size and round in shape, this variety of pepper has the appearance of a large cherry or a small cherry tomato.

1,000 – 2,500

Only 50% the heat
of a jalapeño

Fresno Pepper Fresno Pepper

Same species as the Jalapeno but is more ripe and has a higher vitamin content. Frequently used in ceviche and is one of the most frequently used chilies in salsa.

2500-10000

Only 50% the heat
of a jalapeño

Anaheim Pepper Anaheim Pepper

This mild pepper is also known as California, long green chili, chilacate, chile college, chile de rista, chile verde, Chimayo and Hatch.

500 – 2,500

Only 50% the heat
of a jalapeño

Ancho Pepper Ancho Pepper

Ancho peppers are are the dried version of Poblano, or “people” peppers. Their flavor is somewhat sweet and somewhat raisin-like, with medium heat.
The outer skin has a rich, sweet, raisin-like flavor, which is most commonly associated with the flavor of chili; the inner veins of the pepper are quite hot. When you buy the whole pod, you have the advantage of being able to separate these two distinct flavors.

1,000 – 2,000

Only 40% the heat
of a jalapeño

Pasilla Pepper Pasilla Pepper

The true pasilla pepper is a long, thin pepper 7 to 12 inches long by 1 inch in diameter. Pasillas turn from dark green to dark brown/purple as they mature. Slightly spicy in taste. Called Chilaca in its fresh form.

1,000 – 2,000

Only 40% the heat
of a jalapeño

Poblano Pepper Poblano Pepper

The Poblano is a mild chile pepper, just slightly spicier than a bell pepper.

1,000 – 1,500

Only 30% the heat
of a jalapeño

Espanola Pepper Espanola Pepper

A locally named hot cultivar from New Mexico.

1,000 – 1,500

Only 30% the heat
of a jalapeño

Mirasol Pepper Mirasol Pepper

This thin-skinned pepper can vary more than any other chile in looks, and therefore may be hard to recognize. Sometimes small, sometimes large, smooth or wrinkled, it is quite inconsistent. Known for its distinct berry like, fruity flavor that enhances potatoes chicken, and pork. Spices up hot salsas, stews, and mole sauces.

1,500 – 2,500

Only 30% the heat
of a jalapeño

Peppadew Pepper Peppadew Pepper
"A type of sweet piquante peppers that resemble cherry tomatoes. Contains a mild heat."
1,177

Only 24% the heat
of a jalapeño

Coronado Pepper Coronado Pepper

Originally from South America, the Coronado Pepper grows to 4″ long and 2″ wide with thin, waxy skin. It tastes like a mix of pear and berries, and turns a bright red when ripe. With its mild flavor, it can be eaten fresh, added to dishes for extra flavor, or dried and ground into powder.

700 – 1000

Only 20% the heat
of a jalapeño

New Mexico Pepper New Mexico Pepper

New Mexican chiles are mild, large chiles with a unique flavour. These peppers are the only pepper that is suitable for preparing New Mexican style red sauces, such as enchilada sauce, some salsas or chile marinades.

500 – 1000

Only 20% the heat
of a jalapeño

Santa Fe Grande Pepper Santa Fe Grande Pepper

Santa Fe Grande (Capsicum annuum) The Santa Fe Grande is a very prolific variety used in the southwest. The conical, blunt fruits ripen from greenish-yellow, to orange-yellow to red. The peppers grow upright on 24″ plants. Santa Fe Grande’s have a slightly sweet taste and are fairly mild in pungency.

500 – 700

Only 14% the heat
of a jalapeño

Pimento Pepper Pimento Pepper

The Pimento or Cherry Pepper is a variety of large, red, heart-shaped chile pepper (Capsicum annuum). They are very mild and sweet in taste.

100 – 500

Only 10% the heat
of a jalapeño

Pepperoncini Pepper Pepperoncini Pepper

The pepperoncini (Italian peperone, peperoncino), also known as Tuscan peppers, sweet Italian peppers, banana peppers, waxed peppers, and golden Greek peppers, is a variety of Capsicum annuum. These peppers are mild and sweet with a slight heat to them, and are commonly jarred for use in Greek salads and salad bars.

100 – 500

Only 10% the heat
of a jalapeño

Mexi-Bell Pepper Mexi-Bell Pepper

A cross between Sweet Bell peppers and hotter chile peppers, these look like small, red Bell peppers.

100 -1,000

Only 2% the heat
of a jalapeño

NuMex Big Jim Pepper NuMex Big Jim Pepper

Very large (possible the biggest in the world) of the New Mexican variety. Very mild and sweet.

100 – 1,000

Only 2% the heat
of a jalapeño

Cubanelle Pepper Cubanelle Pepper

The Cubanelle is a variety of sweet pepper. When unripe, it is light yellowish-green in color, but eventually turns bright red. Compared to bell peppers it has thinner flesh, is longer, and has a slightly more wrinkled appearance. It is used extensively in Puerto Rico’s cuisine.

Cubanelle peppers are used in the U.S. to replace Poblano peppers. Most of the cubanelle pepper imports come from the Dominican Republic (where it’s called aji cubanela), which has been of late the main exporter of this cultivar.

100 – 1,000

Only 2% the heat
of a jalapeño

Sweet Bell Pepper Sweet Bell Pepper

Very little to no heat, the common bell pepper comes in a variety of colors, most often green, red, yellow, and orange.

0 – 100

Only 1% the heat
of a jalapeño


Please keep in mind that the Scoville heat units listed are just estimates at best. Scoville units for each sauce or chile pepper may vary greatly due to the seed lineage, season, climate, soil, and other conditions in which the peppers and ingredients are grown.

Comparisons in this Scoville Scale chart to jalapeño peppers are based on an “average” of 5,000 SHU for the jalapeño, and the high end SHU for the sauce or pepper in question.

If you find anything missing from this Scoville Scale chart, please contact me and I’ll try to update this list ASAP. Thanks!

  • Truly awesome work Scott. I had to leverage this and share a link to this on our Peppernutz.com Facebook page for our followers – hope you don’t mind a little extra publicity 🙂

    I notice you don’t have the “Carolina Reaper” on here. What are your thoughts on putting that in the mix? Is it because the scale testing has not been completed yet?

    Tom

    • Thanks, Tom! The Carolina Reaper info should be updated. 🙂

    • Carlos Alexander Demora

      Um yes he does. Open ya eye balls. Its towards the top at 1500000

      • Steve

        Umm, no he didn’t. Why don’t you open your eyes? The FIRST response to the original post was the writer saying he would add it. A year ago.

  • Shybiker

    What a terrifically useful chart. I enjoy many of these and agree with most of your assessments. I just tasted Da’ Bomb Beyond Insanity and was curious what rating its heat had, since my tongue hasn’t been the same since. 🙂

  • Don

    Most comprehensive list of peppers and sauces I have ever came across. Very well done!

  • Thank you all for your kind thoughts. If you find anything missing from this Scoville Scale Chart AND you have access to some good, reliable HPLC test numbers, please let me know.

    • sblack

      Having eaten Buffalo Wild Wings Blazin’ wings many times, I began to wonder about the claims across the internet about its SHU. Below is an email from a BWW’s R&D department employee:

      “We do measure the scoville units of the peppers prior to making the sauce, however once it is complete it is very difficult to measure the heat level due to the other ingredients that are added as they effect the final heat flavor. The scoville range is listed below.
      Sweet BBQ/ Teriyaki / Parm Garlic – 100 – 300
      Honey BBQ – 300- 600
      Asian Zing – 6000-12000
      Mild – 6000-12000
      Spicy Garlic – 9000- 12000
      Caribbean Jerk 15000- 25000
      Medium/ Hot/ Hot BBQ/Wild – 25000 – 50000
      Mango Habanero – 50000- 70000
      Blazin – +70000”

      • Interesting. When I interviewed Sylvia Matzke-Hill, the (now former) Director of Research and Development for BWW, she had informed me that the chain was not going to make any Scoville Heat Unit ranges for their products: http://www.scottrobertsweb.com/firetalkers-interview-with-sylvia-matzke-hill-of-buffalo-wild-wings/

        • sblack

          It seems like what Sylvia was saying in your interview was that they don’t want to make specific claims on the finished product, so I guess that’s why the employee that emailed me phrased it the way they did.

          Regardless, I would have to say that these ratings “feel” right in comparison to the hot sauces that I’ve owned myself like Dave’s Ultimate Insanity, Blair’s Mega Death Sauce, Mad Dog 357 Ghost Pepper, etc.

          • Steve Gregory

            It’s almost like bww read our comments. Here we are a year later and we’ve got a reformulated blazin’ that is easily twice as hot as the old stuff. Thanks for the article, I think you fixed bww!

      • Bryan Fibel

        These numbers seem very off. Based on posted above, common hot sauces that I use daily like Tapatio and Sriracha are like in the 2000-3000 range And their mild is 6,000-12000. That makes no sense.

        • Steve Gregory

          Agreed, their mild is listed as somewhere 2 – 3 times hotter than Tabasco sauce? I eat at BW3’s a few times a month. Mild is nowhere near as hot as Tabasco sauce. I’ve also got a problem with Blazin’ being listed as 200,000 – 350,000 on this list. I have a bottle of Blazin’ in my refrigerator right now and a bottle of Da’ Bomb ground zero in the cabinet, listed here as 234,000. I’ll tell you from first hand experience, there’s really no comparison. Da’ Bomb is SUBSTANTIALLY hotter. Much more than twice as hot. A drop of Da’ Bomb burns your tongue pretty good. I could do a spoonful of Blazin’…and a quarter cup on a dozen wings.

          According to this list I’m making no sense when I “spice up” my Blazin’ with the “milder” ground zero! For a comparison I’d like to see someone coat their wings in ground zero and taste test them against Blazin’.

          On a side note, has anyone noticed how much less hot Blazin’ is now (2015) than it was about 10 – 15 years ago? Why have they tamed down their hottest sauce? Let the people that want less hot get “hot” instead.

  • billycruz81

    The hottest sauce I’ve ever had was da bomb ground zero and it was very hot to me. The other day I bought both the frost bite and magma hot sauces. Both are listed at 1,000,000 Scoville units here. That’s 4 times hotter than da bomb ground zero. But I’m telling you frost bite and magma are only about as hot as tobasco sauce. First I put a drop of each on my finger and liked it. It did NOTHING. No exaggeration. So I put a teaspoon of each together in a 1 Oz container of dipping sauce, stirred it up with my toquito and ate all of it. NOTHING, I’m not kidding. I thought I was going nuts so I had my female roommate that won’t even eat medium salsa try it. I mean this girl is a wimp when it comes to hot stuff. She dipped her toquito in the dipping sauce that had these two hot sauces in it and even she said it wasn’t hot. I don’t understand why this stuff is listed at 1,000,000 Scoville units. I really enjoy the flavor of the magma hit sauce though.

    • sblack

      I too have ordered the Frostbite and Magma duo–to put in my coffee–from the highly recommended HotSauce.com (Frostbite: http://www.hotsauce.com/Frostbite-Hot-Sauce-p/1794.htm Magma: http://www.hotsauce.com/Magma-Hot-Sauce-p/1139mg.htm Gift set: http://www.hotsauce.com/Frostbite-and-Magma-Hot-Sauces-Gift-Set-p/hsc-frostbite-magma-gift-set.htm), and I think I can explain exactly what you are experiencing (unless you just forgot to shake them up). First, Magma is the only one of the two that actually has the 1 million SHU extract in it. Second, just because it is made using 1 million SHU extract doesn’t mean that the entire contents of the bottle is 1 million SHU. You’ve got to take into consideration that the hot pepper extract is diluted throughout all the other ingredients, which is mainly vinegar.

      This is where most people start getting confused about SHU. You could liken it to the marketing genius of McDonald’s chicken nuggets, for example, that are made using white chicken breast; however, they “dilute” it with tons of non-chicken fillers… Unfortunately, these types of marketing strategies exist even in the hot sauce industry where an unsuspecting chili head can be duped by product marketing while browsing through the above sauces and SHUs. However, I don’t believe Scott is trying to mislead anyone. He just seems to be relaying the manufacturers claims who many times are using deceptive marketing concerning what pepper/extract was used to doctor up the sauce while conveniently leaving off the fact that the entire bottle of sauce is not as hot as the pepper/extract that was used to make it.

      Disclaimer: This rule does not apply to some of the “greats” that are obviously food additives only (i.e. Blair’s 16 million, 6 am, 3am, etc.), which generally refer to what SHU the entire bottle is. As with anything… Buyer beware–and be informed.

      Hope this helps. 🙂

      • Chris

        He may not be trying to intentionally mislead someone but his list is wrong. Any true extreme hot sauce lover who has tried frostbite or magma would know that it doesn’t even compare to something like mad dog 357 which is found much farther down the list. If you are going to make a list of the hottest hot sauces they should rank by the SHU of the entire bottle and not the SHU of a single ingredient.

  • Glenn Faught

    I notice you don’t really list how hot the hot sauce is. Instead you list the hottest ingredient used to make the sauce instead of the actual scoville rating the sauce would have after that high heat ingredient is mixed with things like vinegar or tomato. Take Mad Dog 357 Hot Sauce Silver Collector’s Edition for example. Based off your list, it would be 6 million scoville when in fact it is 750,000 scoville. See how big of a difference there is once everything is mixed to make the finished product? Anyways we can get you to make a correct list or link us to one that list the scoville of the finished product instead of listing the scoville of the hottest ingredient used?

    • Glenn, all of these ratings are numbers provided by third party labs or by the hot sauce companies themselves. I do not do the HPLC testing myself. I know that some of these numbers are grossly exaggerated, and are based on the pepper/extract rating, not the rating of the whole sauce.

      • Mark Peters

        I noticed this too. For example, “Melinda’s Red Savina Pepper Sauce” is rated at 577’000 SHU, which is ridiculous. But the advertisement text, where this number seems to be taken from, clearly refers to the actual chili pepper (“The Red Savina”) used in the sauce. So you can’t simply take that number and claim that’s how hot the sauce is. That’s like saying a cocktail is 40% alcohol because it contains rum. It’s simply incorrect and misleading, and if there’s no scoville rating available for the actual sauce, you should simply take it off the list.

  • Patricia Katia Murillo

    Where is the rocoto in this list? And the aji limo? By the way, “poblano” means from Puebla, a city in Mexico, and not “the people’s”.

  • BraveStar3030

    My grandfather used to own a farm where he planted peppers, mostly jalapenos. Every now and then you would get these crazy hot fruits unlike anything you’ve ever tasted. the you would get some that would taste like grass. The variations can be that wild.

  • rb

    very helpful chart. love the pepper-pictures also. helps in identification. got some dried whole peppers from my wife who works at spice manufacturing company, a sample of peri peri peppers. never heard of them. a little bit of internet rsch plus my re-hydrating a piece and eating confirms correct scoville of around 150-200K for birds eye pepper. hot as s..t. great little pepper. can’t wait to concoct something . . . hot.

  • MikeP

    Thanks for the great list!! I was wondering if you could find a rating for Red Rooster hot sauce. I have friend that loves it. He thinks it is hot (he thinks pepperoni is hot)

  • Richard Brothwood

    There’s a chilli sauce that isn’t on here it’s called econa original West Indian hot pepper sauce would like to know where that comes in the scoville chart please

    • Ed Bain

      Somewhere near the bottom. I’ve had it before.

  • SR71Habu

    Has anyone tried Liquid Stupid Hot Sauce? It’s rated at @ 250,000 Scoville Units. I have a bottle, it is hot.
    Also, Dave’s Hurtin’ Habanero Hot Sauce is very tasty, and not hot. I chugged out of the bottle it was so good.

  • Joshua Grasmick

    Awesome chart, but I don’t see Red Apocalypse on there from what I heard it is one of the hottest hot sauces in the world :/

  • thegoodzz

    Cystals hot sauce at 2000-4000 lmao what a joke that shit is the weakest hot sauce ever

    • Del Sonic

      I’ve had Crystal before where I think it’s not hot at all. and then other times I buy it and it rivals tapatio. It really does vary.

  • shang

    I have been liking Goya brand Habanero, It doesn’t seem hot at all but it is supper tasty. I don’t have a photo because I am all out. The place I have bought them, is far from were I live, Alexandria VA. Lately I have been loving Chinese red crispy Chile pepper in oil, OH man it’s so good, again not so hot but super tasty. I like fresh orange Habanero but they are out of season now.

  • jlghertner

    Take a trip during Carnival to Trinidad and stop in a local market. In unlabeled and labels bottles you will find some wonderful sauces made w Trinidads and 7 pot peppers. Some of the best made by a womens cooperative .

    Also, I grow poblanos next to my ghosts and get some excellently hot poblanos for stuffing.

  • Shawn Stoudt

    what about satans shit

  • Shawn Stoudt

    from chilli pepper pete .com

  • Andrew Esselaar

    Great list, but it has the same problem as every list I’ve been seeing: It’s missing the fact that the Frank’s RedHot line has several other sauces besides Original and Xtra Hot, with varying heats, which is what I’m trying to find out. A bar I frequent has started promoting that they carry several of them, something like 7 or 8 different ones (along with Cattlemen’s BBQ and Carolina Tangy Gold, which also seems to be owned by French’s). I realize that since what seems to be the hottest, the Xtra Hot, ranks extremely low on your list, scoring below the ubiquitous Tabasco sauce or the coolest Jalapeno pepper, but seeing as they’re much more widely available than the majority of this chart, it would be very useful to include them. I’m not much of a chilehead, so I’m trying to proceed cautiously, and trial and error would take too long and my lack of chilehead-ness makes me an unsuitable tester. At the grocery store I found most of the ones this bar has, and many of them have a heat scale on the label which works well enough for me, but several don’t (including Original, whose score on this scale I got from every other scale). And it would be nice to get Scoville ratings to “translate” their scale. I was able to find ONE on another site which had a few more, it said the Buffalo was 1,800 SHU, putting it a bit below Xtra Hot, probably the second hottest of the sauces I’m investigating, but the staff said that didn’t sound right. I’m not even sure if the Buffalo listed there or at the bar is the “Frank’s RedHot for Buffalo Wings” I saw in the store. If you make any progress on this front, I thank you in advance!

    (On a side note, to post this comment I clicked on the Facebook icon, and this weird Disqus seized control of the sign-in process, which is incredibly concerning)

  • Christian Arthur Gryphonheart

    What about Wasabi? Does it count?

  • Bad VO Gaming

    Can you add some Jamaican Scotch Bonnet sauces like from Carib or Eaton’s?
    I also really like Arizona Peppers Organic Habanero sauce and a locally produced habanero sauce called Monk Sauce featured by Vice news at 250,000 scoville, very tasty sauces.

    I reorganized my hot sauce shelf based on this list, now it’s easy to know how insane I want to go at a glance. From Louisiana to Dave’s Ghost Pepper I love to have a wide range of heat available.

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  • Jacob Sever

    Any info on Marie Sharp’s line?

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  • William Andrusco

    I’ve tasted 100% pain, I think it’s higher than that. Like 40,000.

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  • Fib Guest

    Nice site, like to see actual peppers and sauces all together. Please add El Camino Sauce to the list, IF you can get it. I find the taste of the Very Small Batch sauce made in Michigan By hand by Mexicans who know what they are doing to have a perfect taste and great hotness, but GREAT TASTE.
    It can be found in the Muskegon, MI area at: Plumbs, Jack’s Corner Store, Wayne’s Deli, Ray’s Mini Mart and Montague Foods
    I will email this to you also, perhaps I can share part of one of my CASE I bought with you.

  • Ya’akov the Jew

    Awesome website with lots of info. I love it!

  • Tom Bottoms

    Hey Scott. Good work here. I just received a bottle of of Dave’s Gourmet Scorpion Pepper sauce. It’s not as hot as I thought it would be, but it is delicious! It certainly deserves a place on your list! Not sure of the shu rating, but it is the hottest non-extract sauce I’ve ever had. Pure Trinidad Moruga Scorpion. But for some reason I don’t think the sauce reaches the same heat level as the actual pepper. Certainly Dave’s Ghost Pepper Naga Jolokia Hot Sauce and probably Dave’s Ultimate Insanity seem hotter. But again, no chemically extract flavor to distract from the fruity, fiery deliciousness that is the Trinidad Moruga Scorpion pepper.

  • greyshark

    Any data on the “Cuban black” pepper?

  • otto42

    Sad that I can’t find my beloved Pico Pica sauce.

  • Thanks so much for this list. It’s been a massive help.